fashion-memopad
fashion-memopad

Alfa Castaldi Photography Exhibit Opening in Milan

The show at Galleria Carla Sozzani at 10 Corso Como store will celebrate the work of the late husband of Anna Piaggi, the legendary Italian fashion editor.

fashion-memopad/news

THE ALFA OF PHOTOGRAPHY: A photo exhibition opening Saturday at the Galleria Carla Sozzani at Milan’s luxury 10 Corso Como store will celebrate the work of photographer Alfa Castaldi, the late husband of Anna Piaggi, the legendary Italian fashion editor who died last August.

Castaldi, who married Piaggi in 1962, started his career as a photo reporter in postwar Milan, where he became one of the most relevant figures of the city’s bohemian intellectual group that used to meet at the storied Bar Jamaica in the arty Brera district.

The meeting with Piaggi in 1958 clearly marked the career of the photographer, who began a series of collaborations with a number of Italian fashion magazines, including Arianna and Vogue. Castaldi, who died in 1995, made a name for himself with standout and avant-garde images — he was the first to shoot a fashion editorial in Eastern Europe in 1968.

The retrospective, which will feature a wide selection of Castaldi’s works, will also include a number of intense and intimate portraits of fashion personalities including Giorgio Armani, Karl Lagerfeld, Ottavio and Rosita Missoni, the Fendi sisters and Gianfranco Ferré, along with a series of private pictures of Piaggi. The exhibition will be run through March 30.

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